ENG

FR

NL

 

Opinion piece by Steven Desair, social entrepreneur with a passion for food and ecology.

Founder of Eatmosphere, Mary Pop-in & Terroir. (Download text)

The short chain can play a crucial role in the transition to a different food system

As a result of the coronavirus epidemic, more and more people are buying their food from farmers through a “short chain”. In this way, they pay the farmer or producer directly, allowing the latter to determine the price themselves and thus manage the supply and demand. Consumers are likely to buy directly from farmers again because they want to eat healthier during this public health crisis, have time to think about where their food comes from and are eager to support the local economy in this difficult time. Short chains therefore only bring positives: you eat according to the seasons, which has less impact on our environment; it benefits your health because the seasonal vegetables and fruit contain the vitamins you need at that moment; you pay a fair price because there are no profit margins going to intermediaries; and it is much tastier because it is grown in season and you get to know your farmers again. 

For example, I also enjoy a diverse range of vegetables from farmer Matthias, 30 years old and the fourth generation on the farm Seasonal flavour. A few years ago he decided to take a different path, opting for small-scale production and selling directly to the customer. Above all, he wanted to set his own prices again. This, as Matthias explains, was not possible when he had only a limited number of crops and sold his products through the auction. "At the auction you hand over your products without knowing the price in advance. The inspector determines the price category based on aesthetic requirements. The auction room itself is governed by the laws of supply and demand. The price starts in a  defined price category and decreases until one of the supermarket buyers accepts it. It is therefore a competition for buyers to keep the price as low as possible for supermarkets. For example, it often happened that an oversupply results in prices lower than the price of production. Unfortunately, consumers do not notice these price fluctuations and are therefore often unaware of the reality behind the price displayed on their ticket. They are probably paying the same price as always, but do not know that the farmers have received a much lower return for these products. As a farmer, you try to reduce the cost price by producing more. But it is clear that an oversupply will lower the price. It's a vicious circle.” Matthias is happy to have chosen to leave this system, and I am convinced the difference shows. He chose greater economic security and stability. He chose quality instead of quantity. He chose freedom. (read more below the picture)

Matthias & Steven

Copyright: Lies Engelen Photography. Matthias & Steven on the field.

Today, his sales have increased by 200 % during this strange period. A nice result, isn't it? However, I still see Matthias scratching his head every week during this "heyday" period of the coronavirus. Doubling a farmer's sales figures is not as easy as 1 + 1 = 2. Other factors come into play. To understand, let's take a tour of Matthias’ farm. He literally does everything from A to Z. From administration, packaging, HR, sales, logistics, harvesting to sowing. Essentially, the structure of a large company compressed into an artisanal profession. When you're a small player you are forced to take on so many things, you just can't go twice as fast. The increase in turnover hurts this balance. And what does that 200% turnover mean if you can barely cover your costs? Matthias has eliminated intermediaries, such as auctions and supermarkets, in order to keep more margin for himself. But his costs have also increased because he manages everything himself. Suppose that the real cost to produce a leek is 1 euro but that he sells it for 80 cents. He already loses 20 cents per leek. You might think, just sell it at 1.50 euros. But that would mean a return to the law of supply and demand. And Matthias does not want to stray too far from supermarket prices, for fear of being labelled expensive. So he pays a hefty price for the limited freedom he bought in distancing himself from the auction process. His business struggles to compete with quantity and efficiency. It’s a David vs Goliath story.

Competing against multinationals with thousands of employees, where mathematical models determine purchasing and sales policies, is a bridge too far for Matthias' small economic model. The economy of scale dictates the law in this society. That influence is evident in the measures linked to the coronavirus which prohibit small farmers' markets but authorize large supermarkets that welcome 1,000 to 3,000 visitors per day. Two weights, two measures. Don't get me wrong, I understand of course that there are more and more mouths to feed. And it has to be affordable for everyone. Supermarkets and the industrial revolution in agriculture have been innovative solutions that meet this demand. However, with this development, many hidden flaws have crept into the process. The impact of pesticides on the environment and our health and are just two examples among many. Imagine if we could calculate the impact on our health and the cost of declining natural resources, then add these factors to the price of conventional products. Our food would become priceless. Wouldn't it be (financially) healthier to choose high-quality food that is accessible to everyone? (read more under the photo) 

22-Harvesting & Dining in the Field.jpg

Copyright: Lies Engelen Photography. Harvesting together at the Livinushof farm. 

The "short chain" model can therefore play a crucial role in the transition to a different food system. However, these pioneering farmers need support in their growth.  Ideally, governments, research institutes, citizens and companies could consider the task alongside Matthias and thus support his quest to offer us tasty and healthy local food in a sustainable way, for the benefit of him, our society, our nature and our economy. Our efforts must also extend beyond the coronavirus crisis. Start looking for your seasonal farmer(s) already. Help them if you can. Appreciate their professional pride and passion. After all, they practice one of the oldest professions in the world. Regional farmers co-create our nature and our landscape, they stimulate tourism and the catering industry through the typical local products that define the identity of a region. Just think of the North Sea shrimp - caviar of the Belgians, the Boechout apple region, the Mechelen asparagus, the Geraardsbergen mattetaarten, the Brabant’s grondwitloof, ...It's time to give to these unsung heroes, these modern day Don Quixotes, the podium they deserve. 

 

I'd like to give the final word to Matthias: “As a company we don't want to use more land in the future, but we do want to make better use of the land, make optimal use of the seasons and the natural characteristics of the plants. Ultimately, the intention is that we, the smaller producers, will be able to feed the big cities. But for this, we not only need support from the consumer, but also from the government and municipalities. Only then can it be included in urban development plans and in government policy. I hope that in the future there will be a greater awareness among people of where their food comes from, how it is grown and why it is so incredibly important”. 

 

 

Bon appétit. 

Steven Desair

steven@eatmosphere.be

0498 80 37 68

ENG

FR

NL

Une carte blanche de Steven Desair, entrepreneur social passionné par l’alimentation et l’écologie. Fondateur e.a. de Eatmosphere, Mary Pop-in et Terroir. (Télécharger le texte)

 

Le « circuit court » peut également jouer un rôle crucial dans la transition vers un autre système d’alimentation

Suite à l’épidémie de coronavirus, de plus en plus de personnes achètent leurs aliments chez des fermiers « en circuit court ». De cette manière, ils paient directement le fermier ou producteur, ce qui permet à ces derniers de déterminer eux-mêmes le prix et d’ainsi gérer l’offre et la demande. Si les consommateurs s’approvisionnent à nouveau directement chez les fermiers, c’est probablement parce qu’ils ont la volonté de manger plus sainement pendant cette crise sanitaire, qu’ils ont le temps de réfléchir sur la provenance de leurs aliments et souhaitent soutenir l’économie locale en ces temps difficiles. Le circuit court ne présente que des aspects positifs : vous mangez de saison en diminuant votre impact sur la nature, vous faites du bien à votre santé car les fruits et légumes de saison vous procurent les vitamines dont vous avez besoin à ce moment-là, vous payez un prix équitable en supprimant les marges bénéficiaires pour les intermédiaires, vous profitez de produits encore plus savoureux et vous apprenez à connaître votre fermier !

Moi-même, je profite par exemple chaque semaine de l’offre très variée de légumes cultivés par Matthias, 30 ans et représentant la quatrième génération de cultivateurs de la ferme Seizoensmaak. Il y a quelques années, il a complètement revu sa manière de faire les choses en optant pour une production à petite échelle et en vendant directement au client. Il avait avant tout envie de déterminer lui-même ses prix. Ce qui, comme Matthias l'explique, n'était pas possible lorsqu'il n'avait qu'un nombre limité de cultures et qu'il vendait ses produits par le biais de la criée. « À la criée, vous donnez vos produits sans connaître le prix à l'avance. Le juge de la criée détermine la catégorie de prix en fonction des exigences esthétiques. La salle des ventes applique la loi de l'offre et de la demande. Le prix démarre dans la catégorie de prix définie et diminue jusqu'à ce que l'un des acheteurs du supermarché l'accepte. Les acheteurs doivent donc maintenir ce prix le plus bas possible pour les supermarchés. Par exemple, il arrive souvent qu'en raison d'une offre excédentaire, les enchères soient inférieures au prix de production. Malheureusement, les consommateurs ne remarquent pas ces fluctuations de prix. Ils n'ont donc souvent pas conscience de la réalité qui se cache derrière le prix affiché sur leur ticket. Ils paient probablement comme toujours le même prix mais ne savent pas que les agriculteurs ont reçu un prix beaucoup plus bas pour ces produits. En tant que fermier, vous essayez de réduire le prix de revient en produisant davantage. Mais comme vous le savez maintenant, l'offre excédentaire fait chuter le prix. C'est un cercle vicieux. » Matthias est heureux d'avoir fait le choix de sortir de ce système, et je suis convaincu que cela se voit. Il a choisi plus de sécurité et de stabilité économiques. Il a choisi la qualité plutôt que la quantité. Il a choisi la liberté. 

Matthias & Steven

Copyright: Lies Engelen Photography. Matthias et Steven.

Aujourd'hui, son chiffre d'affaires a augmenté de 200 % au cours de cette période que nous vivons actuellement. Un beau résultat, n'est-ce pas ? Pourtant, je vois encore Matthias se gratter la tête chaque semaine pendant cette période « dorée » du coronavirus. Doubler les chiffres de vente d'un agriculteur ne revient malheureusement pas simplement à faire 1 + 1= 2. De nombreux facteurs entrent en jeu. Regardons un peu dans le jardin de Matthias. Il s'occupe de tout de A à Z : l'administration, l'emballage, les ressources humaines, les ventes, la logistique, la récolte et les semences comprises. Soit la structure d'une grande entreprise comprimée dans une profession artisanale. Quand on est un petit acteur et que l'on doit assumer autant de choses, on ne peut pas aller deux fois plus vite. L'augmentation du chiffre d'affaires, vous la sentez passer. Et que signifie ce chiffre d'affaires de 200 % si vous pouvez à peine couvrir vos frais ? Matthias a éliminé les intermédiaires, comme la vente à la criée et les supermarchés, afin de garder plus de marge pour lui. Mais ses frais ont aussi augmenté parce qu'il gère tout lui-même. Supposons que son coût réel pour produire un poireau est de 1 euro mais qu'il le vende à 80 centimes, il perd ainsi déjà 20 centimes par poireau. Vous pensez peut-être qu'il lui suffit de le vendre à 1,50 euro. Mais hausser le prix de vente n'est pas une option, car ce serait revenir à cette loi de l'offre et de la demande. Et Matthias ne veut pas trop s'écarter des prix des supermarchés, de peur d'être considéré comme cher. Il paie donc un prix pour la liberté limitée qu'il a achetée en s'éloignant de la vente à la criée. Son entreprise a du mal à rivaliser avec la quantité et l'efficacité. Matthias est comme David contre Goliath.

Entrer en concurrence avec des multinationales comptant des milliers d'employés, où les modèles mathématiques déterminent les politiques d'achat et de vente, est un combat inégal pour le petit modèle économique de Matthias. L'économie d'échelle dicte la loi dans cette société. Cette influence se manifeste dans les mesures liées au coronavirus qui interdisent les petits marchés de producteurs mais autorisent les grands supermarchés accueillant 1 000 à 3 000 visiteurs par jour. Deux poids, deux mesures.

 

Ne vous méprenez pas, je comprends bien sûr qu'il y a de plus en plus de bouches à nourrir. Et cela doit être abordable pour tout le monde. Les supermarchés et la révolution industrielle dans l'agriculture ont été des solutions innovantes pour répondre à cette demande. Cependant, avec cette évolution, de nombreux vices cachés se sont glissés dans le processus. L'impact des pesticides sur notre santé et sur la nature n'en sont que deux exemples parmi d'autres. Imaginez que nous puissions calculer cet impact sur notre santé et la perte de ressources naturelles et ajouter ces facteurs au prix des produits conventionnels. Notre nourriture deviendrait impayable. Ne serait-il pas plus sain (financièrement) de choisir une alimentation de qualité et accessible à tous ?

22-Harvesting & Dining in the Field.jpg

Copyright: Lies Engelen Photography. Harvesting together at the Livinushof farm. 

Le « circuit court » peut également jouer un rôle crucial dans la transition vers un autre système d’alimentation. Pour y arriver, ces fermiers pionniers ont besoin de soutien dans leur développement. Le gouvernement, les instituts de recherche, les citoyens, les entreprises peuvent tous accompagner Matthias dans sa réflexion et ainsi l’aider à nous proposer des aliments locaux savoureux et sains de manière durable pour lui, notre société, notre nature et notre argent.

   

Nos efforts doivent également se prolonger au-delà de la crise du coronavirus. Commencez déjà à chercher votre (ou vos) fermier(s) saisonnier(s). Aidez-les si vous pouvez. Appréciez leur fierté et leur passion. Après tout, ils exercent après tout l'un des plus vieux métiers du monde, co-créent la biodiversité d'une région, stimulent le tourisme et la restauration à travers les produits régionaux typiques et contribuent à définir l'identité d'une région. Pensez par exemple aux crevettes de la mer du Nord (caviar des Belges), aux fraises de Wépion, aux pommes et poires des vergers de Hesbaye, aux chicons de terre du Brabant, aux asperges de Malines… Il est temps de donner à ces héros sous-payés, ces Don Quichote des temps modernes, le podium qu’ils méritent. 

 

Laissons à Matthias le soin de donner le mot de la fin : « En tant qu'entreprise, nous ne voulons pas utiliser plus de terres à l'avenir, mais en faire un meilleur usage, tirer un profit optimal des saisons et des propriétés naturelles des plantes. En fin de compte, l'objectif est que nous, les petits producteurs, puissions nourrir les grandes villes. Mais pour cela, nous avons également besoin du soutien du consommateur, mais aussi du gouvernement et des municipalités. C’est une condition indispensable pour que notre façon de cultiver puisse être incluse dans les plans de développement urbain, dans la politique gouvernementale. J'espère qu'à l'avenir, les gens seront plus conscients de la provenance de leurs aliments, de la manière dont ils sont cultivés et pourquoi cela est si important. »

 

Bon appétit.

Steven Desair

steven@eatmosphere.be

0498 80 37 68

ENG

FR

NL

Opiniestuk Steven Desair, sociaal ondernemer met passie voor eten en ecologie.

Oprichter o.a. Eatmosphere, Mary Pop-in & Terroir. (download tekst)

 

Korte Keten: Kort door de Corona bocht

Door de huidige corona crisis kopen mensen massaal hun voedingsmiddelen bij zogenaamde “korte keten”-boeren. Korte keten is rechtstreeks kopen bij de boeren of producenten, op die manier kunnen de landbouwers of producenten hun prijs en het aanbod zelf bepalen. De consumenten kopen waarschijnlijk weer rechtstreeks bij de boeren omdat ze tijdens deze publieke gezondheidscrisis gezonder willen eten, tijd hebben om stil te staan bij waar hun voeding vandaan komt en de lokale economie graag steunen in moeilijke tijden. Korte keten is dan ook alleen maar positief; je eet volgens de seizoenen wat minder impact heeft op onze natuur, het komt je gezondheid ten goede want de seizoensgroenten en -fruit bevatten de vitamines die je op dat moment nodig hebt, je betaalt een eerlijke prijs want er gaan geen winstmarges naar tussenpartijen, het is veel smakelijker doordat het in het seizoen geteeld is en je leert je boeren weer kennen. 

Zo geniet ik zelf ook wekelijks van een zeer divers aanbod groenten van Boer Matthias, 30 jaar en de vierde generatie op boerderij Seizoensmaak. Een aantal jaren geleden besloot hij om resoluut een andere weg in te slaan, kleinschalige productie en rechtstreeks verkopen aan de klant. Hij wou vooral ook weer zijn eigen prijzen bepalen. Toen ze maar een beperkt aantal gewassen verbouwden en samenwerkten met de veiling was dat anders. Matthias legt het even uit: “Op de veiling geef je je producten af zonder op voorhand de prijs te kennen. De keurder van de veiling bepaalt de prijscategorie op basis van esthetische eisen. In de veilingzaal geldt de wet van vraag en aanbod. De prijs start bij de bepaalde prijscategorie en daalt tot er een van de inkopers van de supermarkten afdrukt. Voor de inkopers is het dus een sport om voor de supermarkten die prijs zo laag mogelijk te houden. Zo gebeurde het regelmatig dat er o.a. door een overaanbod lager was geboden dan de productieprijs. Helaas merkt de consument niets van die prijsschommelingen. Consumenten kennen veelal de realiteit achter de prijs op hun kassaticket niet. Ze betalen waarschijnlijk dezelfde prijs maar weten niet dat de boeren een veel lagere prijs hebben gekregen voor die producten. Als boer probeer je de kostprijs te drukken door meer te produceren. Maar zoals we net geleerd hebben, overaanbod keldert de prijs. Een straatje zonder eind”. Matthias is blij de keuze gemaakt te hebben om uit dat systeem te stappen, en ik ben ervan overtuigd dat ik dat proef. Hij koos voor meer economische zekerheid en stabiliteit. Hij koos voor kwaliteit in de plaats van kwantiteit. Hij koos voor vrijheid. (lees verder onder de foto)

Matthias & Steven

Copyright: Lies Engelen Photography. Matthias & Steven.

Vandaag is zijn omzet tijdens deze vreemde periode met 200 % gestegen. Mooi toch? Alleen zie ik boer Matthias tijdens de corona-“hoogdagen” ook nu nog elke week met zijn handen in het haar zitten. Een verdubbeling van de verkoopcijfers is bij boeren namelijk niet zo eenvoudig als 1+1=2. Er komt veel meer bij kijken. Laat ons even mee-boeren met Matthias. Hij doet letterlijk alles van A tot Z. Van administratie, verpakken, HR, sales, logistiek, oogsten tot en met zaaien. De structuur van een groot bedrijf gecomprimeerd in een ambachtelijk beroep. Als je zo klein bent, en zo veel op je boterham moet nemen, dan kan je niet zomaar twee keer zo snel schakelen. De omzetstijging doet inderdaad pijn. En wat betekent die 200% omzet als je je kosten maar nauwelijks kan dekken? Matthias schakelde de tussenpartijen, zoals de veiling en de supermarkten, uit om meer marge voor zich houden, maar hij heeft hierdoor nu ook meer kosten omdat hij alles voor eigen rekening neemt. Stel zijn werkelijke kost om een preistengel te produceren is 1 euro maar hij verkoopt die aan 80 eurocent, dan verliest hij dus 20 eurocent per preistengel. Een stijging in verkoop is dan vooral niet wenselijk. Je denkt, verkoop die preistengel gewoon aan 1,50 eurocent. Alleen komen we weer bij die wet van vraag een aanbod. Matthias wil toch niet te ver afwijken van de prijzen van de supermarkten, want anders wordt hij als duur bestempeld. Hij betaalt een prijs voor de beperkte vrijheid die hij heeft gekocht door afstand van de veiling te nemen. Zijn onderneming heeft het moeilijk om te concurreren met kwantiteit en efficiëntie. Een David vs Goliath verhaal. 

Concurreren met multinationals met duizenden werknemers, waar mathematische modellen het aankoop- en verkoopbeleid bepalen is een brug te ver voor het kleine economische model van Matthias. Schaalgrootte dicteert de wet in deze maatschappij. Die invloed zie je zelf bij de huidige Corona regels die kleine boerenmarkten verbieden, maar grote supermarkten met dagelijks 1000 tot 3000 personen bezoekers wel toelaten. Twee maten, twee gewichten. Versta me niet verkeerd, we moeten inderdaad steeds meer monden voeden. En dat moet betaalbaar zijn voor iedereen. Supermarkten en industriële revolutie in de landbouw zijn innovatieve oplossingen geweest op die vraag. Alleen zijn er met die evolutie heel wat verborgen kosten mee in het proces geslopen. De impact van pesticiden op onze gezondheid en onze natuur om er maar twee te noemen. Stel je voor dat we die verborgen gezondheidskosten en het verlies van natuurrijkdom kunnen berekenen en toevoegen aan de prijs van gangbare producten. Onze voeding zou onbetaalbaar worden. Zou het dan niet (financieel) gezonder zijn de keuze te maken voor kwalitatief hoogwaardige voeding die toegankelijk is voor iedereen? (lees verder onder de foto) 

22-Harvesting & Dining in the Field.jpg

Copyright: Lies Engelen Photography. Gleaning bij het Livinushof. 

Het “korte keten”-model kan dan ook een cruciale rol spelen in de transitie naar een ander voedselsysteem. Alleen hebben deze pioniersboeren ondersteuning in hun groei nodig. Overheden, onderzoeksinstellingen, burgers, bedrijven, allen kunnen ze meedenken met Matthias en hem dus helpen ons van smakelijke, gezonde, lokale voeding te voorzien op een duurzame manier voor hem, onze maatschappij, onze natuur en onze centen. Niet alleen tijdens deze crisis, ook in de post-corona periode. Begin alvast met je lokale seizoensboer(en) op te zoeken, help misschien eens mee. Waardeer hun beroepsfierheid en passie. Ze beoefenen ten slotte een van de oudste beroepen ter wereld, co-creëren onze natuur en ons landschap, stimuleren toerisme en de horeca door de typische streekproducten en bepalen de identiteit van een regio. Denk maar aan de Noordzeegarnaal, caviaar van de Belgen, de Boechoutse appelstreek, de Mechelse asperges, de mattetaarten van Geraardsbergen, Brabants grondwitloof, … Tijd om deze onderbetaalde helden, deze Don Quichotes een podium te geven. 

 

Het slotwoord geef ik graag aan Matthias: “Als bedrijf willen we in de toekomst niet meer land gebruiken maar het land wel beter gaan gebruiken, optimaal gebruik maken van de seizoenen en natuurlijke eigenschappen van de planten. Uiteindelijk is het namelijk wel de bedoeling dat wij, de kleinere producenten, de grote steden kunnen gaan voeden. Maar hiervoor hebben we ook ondersteuning nodig, vanuit de consument maar ook vanuit de overheid en gemeentes. Alleen dan kan het meegenomen worden in de plannen voor de stedenbouw, in het beleid van de overheid. Ik hoop dat in de toekomst er een groter bewustzijn is onder mensen waar hun eten vandaan komt, hoe het verbouwd is en waarom dat nou zo ontzettend belangrijk is.’ 

 

Bon appétit. 

Steven Desair

steven@eatmosphere.be

0498 80 37 68

  • Black Facebook Icon
  • Black Instagram Icon